Browsing: CinéEqual

Social Justice Cinema

Several years ago, residents of Roudbar village in northern Iran learned that the existence of their hamlet would be sacrificed to what the Iranian government deemed a higher good: the construction of a dam to produce electricity for the regional grid. https://vimeo.com/285591514 In their documentary film, “Stoppage Dam,” — the second-place winner of the Yale Environment 360 Video Contest — videographers Yaser Talebi and Mitra Roohimanesh speak with villagers who lament their relocation to a barren settlement and the government’s inadequate compensation scheme, which doesn’t begin to cover the cost of building new homes. The Clourd Dam was completed recently; many of…

WIM Wenders has been given access to Pope Francis and produced a film that gives the viewer a line that tends to reiterate what many feel is known already – namely, he is the most likeable and progressive Pontiff, well, ever. Called Pope Francis: A Man of His Word, it doesn’t so much tell us about what it’s like to be given such a job, but give him space to talk about inequality and social justice. The interview is hardly Paxman-esque, but still offers an insight as to being the head of the Catholic church today. https://youtu.be/MOmY8i-uBcY • The Negotiator, starring Jon…

M. Karunanidhi, five-time chief minister of Tamil Nadu and one of the dominant figures in the politics of southern India for half a century, died on Tuesday at the age of 94. An outspoken atheist in a country where politicians often trumpet their piety, Karunanidhi built his political machine as a crusader for social justice, with policies aimed at helping those at the bottom of India’s rigid Hindu caste hierarchy. Thousands of his supporters gathered outside the hospital in Chennai to mourn his demise, as scores of policemen kept watch. Roads outside the hospital and at Karunanidhi’s residence were packed…

For those looking for social justice films and films about environment protection, there is a new streaming service: ECOSTREAMZ. ECOSTREAMZ is  ad-free, subscription-based VOD platform delivering factual and narrative content, both feature and short about environmental, conservation, human rights and social justice-themed issues, to laptops, mobile devices and HD televisions worldwide. In these polarizing and often difficult times we currently live in, easy access to information about important environmental and societal issues is critical to raising awareness and ultimately improving the world around us. Yet, the mainstream media, only covers a fraction of the problems we face on a daily…

The feature documentary Gaza Surf Club continues its commercial screenings across the Arab world after it was first released in Kuwait as the first documentary to be screened in Kuwaiti cinemas. The film will be commercially released in Prime Cinemas at Baraka Mall in Jordan starting Thursday, 26 July. Recently, Gaza Surf Club opened the 3rd Karama Beirut Human Rights Film Festival with a full house screening. It also witnessed several successful screenings at Cairo Cinema Days and the Goethe Institutein Cairo. The film also took part in the Haifa Independent Film Festival (HIFF) and the MONA Film Festival. In November, 2017, the film received the University Juries Award for Best Documentary at…

In the metro film screenings or film festivals, there are certain kinds of boundaries,” says documentary filmmaker Saba Dewan “We never challenge our boundaries. We more or less know the nature of questions metro audiences would ask in post-screening discussions. Not so in small towns!”She says she has gone to many film festivals organised by ‘Cinema of Resistance’ in big and small towns, especially in the Hindi heartland. But the questions asked, the content of the discussion, the boundaries of intellectual thresholds that are pushed and the reinterpretation of the cinematic narrative have been refreshingly different and original. All these…

Credit to those responsible for the Purge series for recognizing its potential for redemption. What began as yet another movie with a promising premise but disappointing execution has become the ultimate vessel for social and political commentary in our age of stratification. The First Purge is, fittingly, the first one in the series to be truly cathartic for those feeling anxiety over the rise of the far right. It may not for everyone—you do have to already be on board with the overall Purge premise, even if you haven’t seen all of the movies. But after almost losing its way a few times,…

Opinions about Indian cinema’s latest trilingual social drama, Kaala (2018), directed by Pa. Ranjith, India’s Spike Lee, have congested media feeds recently. These coterminous appraisals are dominated by speculations about subversive mythopoeia, national cataclysms, or sub-national identities audio-visually asserted through an aggregation of starpower, symbols, and speech. Yet, for all the vivid autochthony saturating the film, it is neither parochial nor insular. Kaala’s protreptic narrative has an au courant global appeal. The preamble animation, an innovation inaugurated by Kollywood films like Anand Shankar’s Iru Mugan (2016) and Pushkar and Gayatri’s Vikram Vedha (2017), prologues the struggle for territorial control and land authority as the sine qua non of civilization. Thereby establishing Kaala’s narrative…

In the wake of global turmoil and Hollywood’s re-examination of its codes of conduct, the launch of Artists for Change, Artists4Change.org, the non-profit that is committed to playing a critical role in stimulating social change through film and digital content, arrives at a critical time. Founder Julia Verdin, an accomplished producer and award-winning director, brought together a group of like-minded film industry individuals in her belief that the power of collective voice can make a change. Verdin says, “Those of us who work in the film and TV industries carry an incredible responsibility in these troubled times”. Artists for Change…

A Thousand Girls Like Me a film directed by Sahra Mosawi-Mani is scheduled to screen today, June 20, 2018 at the Human Rights Watch Film Festival in New York and it will be coming to MUBI in 4 days. We had the opportunity of interviewing  Sahra Mosawi-Mani and we asked her to present her film to our audience. https://vimeo.com/276049308 A Thousand Girls Like Me begins in 2014 when, appearing on a national television show, Khatera publicly accuses her father: for more than 13 years, Khatera suffered physical abuse and repeated rape at the hands of her father, resulting in numerous pregnancies. Most of Khatera’s…

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